Tag Archives: essential oils

Ask Dahlia: Facts About Exfoliating

ADRIENNE ASKS …
“Why doesn’t SALVE have an exfoliant for the face? What do you use?”

DAHLIA SAYS …

Great to hear from you, Adrienne. You ask an excellent question. Okay,  so there’s a misconception about exfoliating, that you need something scrubby on your face.  It’s actually not true,  and some scrubs can be damaging to the skin,  especially if they are coarse or have angles that do not soften when wet or that are jagged under a microscope.

You can get pretty awesome results from clays and other things like seaweed, loofah or even rice. I teach a SALVE workshop on exfoliation, and I’ll try to share some concepts in this article.

SALVE has two clays, rhassoul and kaolin clay. They are both excellent for sucking garbage from the pores,  removing dead skin and making the skin more even-toned. Of course,  you can blend these with any fresh ingredient based on the condition of your skin;  milk, juice,  water,  yogurt,  etc.

Personally,  I like to remove masks with a raw (wet) loofah. We sell them, but you can always go to the drug store and find them. If you want the scrubby feel, I like to use the kelp (we sell it as part of the SALVE Make Your Own Fresh Mask gift set).

So the way I use it is,  after you’ve washed your face,  keep you face wet,  and pour some on your fingers and massage into face in circular motion. Kelp is a sticky plant and it clumps together,  so make sure your face is wet enough to get that scrub all over. It’s not a great mask all by itself,  but you can certainly add it to the other clays. Kelp is extremely exfoliating if you use it as a scrub,  and your face will be so soft and smooth after! Plus, it’s totally safe to use as much and as often as you want. There are so many types of clays and ingredients you can use to make a mask. Here are my favorites … I’ll add to this list a little more later.

EXFOLIATING WITH CLAY

RHASSOUL CLAY
This clay is a miracle detoxifier for both the face and scalp. Rhassoul clay’s most impressive properties in skin improvement are its capacity of absorption due to its high level of ion exchange. When applied to the face Rhassoul clay removes oil, dirt and pollutants from the skin that the ordinary cleanser can not reach. When applied to the hair and scalp, it will cleanse, provide moisture, detangle and provide shine in ways that your ordinary shampoo simply can’t.

Clinical studies have been conducted by two different research laboratories in the United States (International Research Services, Inc. www.irsi.org and Structure Probe, Inc. www.2spi.com) to evaluate Rhassoul clay mask on skin condition.

The study results showed that a single use of our Rhassoul clay mask statistically:

  • Reduces dryness (79%)
  • Reduces flakiness (41%)
  • Improves skin clarity (68%)
  • Improves skin elasticity / firmness (24%)
  • Improves skin texture (106%)

Optional: Add 2-3 drops of SALVE’s Melaleuca or Neem Oil to create a soothing acne mask. For a super hydrating mask, add 2-3 drops with Salve’s Neem or Oranic Rosehip Seed Oil.

[Download our Recipe Card]

KAOLIN CLAY
Remove radical and harmful pollutants from your skin with this ancient Chinese mask. It helps stimulate circulation to the skin while gently exfoliating and cleansing it, leaving you with brighter, hydrated and calm skin. Suitable for all skin types but caters to dry, sensitive and acne-prone skin. This clay will not dry out your skin or remove your skin’s natural sebum.

Optional: Add 2-3 drops of Salve’s Melaleuca or Neem Oil to create a soothing acne mask. For a super hydrating mask, add 2-3 drops with Salve’s Neem or Oranic Rosehip Seed Oil.

KELP
Our organic milled Atlantic kelp grows deep in the cold sub-tidal waters of the North Atlantic Sea. It is responsibly harvested, dried and milled following organic standards. Add kelp powder to bath salts, facials, bath teas, and body wraps. It is a yellowish green colored powder with a fish-like, seaweed aroma and flavor. Sea kelp contains chlorophyll, an essential fatty acid that helps detoxify the skin and body and improve the skin’s elasticity. Sea kelp also contains carbohydrates that stimulate the skin’s ability to heal and vitamin A, an antioxidant, that normalizes skin cells. Proteins and amino acids are also present, and are the building blocks of cells, and act as skin conditioners.

BENTONITE CLAY
Bentonite clay is actually volcanic ash which is a great anticeptic. It’s great for skin problems such as aczema, rashes, yeast problems and parasites. Some eat this clay to help with stomach problems and constipation, but I’m not sure if I’m a believer.

CITRUS
Citrus is absorbs oils and is great for acne, and even combats dryness. It has a high amount of vitamin c which prevents wrinkles, hydrates, evens the skin tone and even brightens the skin. If you use citrus in your masks, or even in your regular skin care routine, avoid using citrus (vitamin c) products when going outside. It can increase risk for skin damage and can be counter productive. Ironically, the Arizona Cancer Center has reported that oranges (vitamin c), when applied to the skin before sun exposure, can prevent sun damage. Just be smart.

YOGURT
Smells terrible, so get vanilla. Doesn’t matter if it’s Greek or not. Yogurt is super hydrating, it unblocks clogged pores, reduces bacteria, softens skin, reduces wrinkles and hydrates. So refreshing, especially with sunburned or sensitive skin.

HONEY
If you don’t know about honey by now, it’s time you hear the amazing benefits. Ancient Egyptians used it for cuts to disinfect and heal. It’s great to kill bacteria, suck on if you have a sore throat and helps treat burns. Honey regenerates skin cells and is a natural antiseptic. It is a humectant, which means it keeps moisture on the skin.  It takes 10 lbs of honey to make 1 lb of wax.

VITAMIN E
Soothes skin and aids in healing. It reduces appearance of scars and soothes sunburn. It’s a natural sunscreen, but don’t use it as a sole source for sunscreen because we don’t know the amount of SPF protection.

ROSEHIP
Rosehip is not rose petals, it’s the oil produced from bud portion that’s left after the pedals have fallen off. It contains omega 3 & 6 fatty acids and is perfect for dehydrated skin, stretch marks, hyper pigmentation (scarring), reduces wrinkles and premature aging.

LAVENDER
One of my favorite add-ons to a mask is Lavender. It’s great for all sorts of skin problems including acne, eczema, and is super calming. Plus it adds a nice fragrance to your mask.

NEEM
So good for skin problems including acne. It’s high in fatty acids and great for killing bacteria. Neem is also good to add to your daily moisturizer.

TEA TREE (MELALEUCA)
Anti fungal and a disinfectant, tea tree is awesome for masks, especially if you have bumpy, acne-prone or clogged skin.

EXFOLIATING WITH SCRUBS
Scrubs are so much fun and a great way to polish the skin to remove unwanted flaky, bumpy and dry skin. You’ve got be smart about what scrubby things you use on your face, because not all things are good and can actually cause damage.

BEST for Face
-clay
-plant-based (kelp)
-oats (any size, watch the drains!)
-enzymes (natural citrus or crushed pineapple)
-powder grains (rice, flours)
-jojoba beads
-loofah (wet, raw)
-charcoal powders

OKAY for Face
-sugar (prefer it be small granules)
-ground/powdered nuts without shells
-used coffee grounds (watch the drains!)

BAD for Face
-salt (all sizes)-ground nut shells, e.g. walnut (watch the drains!)
-any uneven grain (whatever you use needs to be round and small)

I’ll add more to this article soon. Have fun with your mask! Holler at me if you have any questions. We’ll be posting some of our customers’ favorite recipes on our site, so stay tuned!

-Dahlia

Written by Dahlia Kelada
SALVE and SalveNaturals.com © 2015 All Rights Reserved

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to cure, prevent or treat any disease. Please use common sense and always talk to your doctor before starting any new treatment or application for a health condition.

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Clove Essential Oil

What are essential oils?
Essential oils are defined as a natural oil typically obtained by distillation and having the characteristic fragrance of the plant. Basically, it’s an oil that is derived from a plant, that still carries the essence of the plant with it, including the fragrance and it’s natural uses for a healthier body. Some essential oils can be used directly on the skin, while others cannot and certain essential oils should be avoided while pregnant. (See our previous blog post on essential oils to avoid while pregnant and breastfeeding.)

Clove essential Oil
Clove essential oil is usually extracted from the buds of the Eugenia caryophyllata (clove) plant. It has a beautiful woody aroma with a bit of a fruity undertone. Clove has traditionally been used in India and China for its medicinal properties, and even as a spice in some of their traditional dishes. In researching for this blog article, I was able to read many anecdotal accounts of how clove oil has helped people with their medical and physical needs. One of the most interesting, was an account of how clove oil helped with one girls hypothyroidism. She used clove oil topically over her thyroid and it helped to stimulate her thyroid, aiding in treating her thyroid issue. While her results may not be true for everyone, I found it to be an interesting insight into just how powerful natural remedies can be!

Health Benefits of Clove Essential Oil
Clove essential oil is known for its many medicinal uses. This oil is antiseptic, which is useful for using on small wounds but it also can be used on fungal infections such as athlete’s foot and scabies. It has also been known to treat those annoying infections of the eye known as a sty. Clove oil is also widely known for its uses as an aid to a healthy immune system. It has antiviral properties that help to strengthen the immune system, which is a welcome trait with flu season just around the corner. It also works remarkably well as a dental aid. It can help to freshen breath, kills bacteria in the mouth, provide a defense against cavities, and provide relief to your tooth aches. Clove essential oil is also used in aromatherapy and is known as an effective way to reduce headaches.

Other Benefits of Clove Essential Oil
Clove essential oil can be used to discourage your pets from chewing on your furniture, a safe and natural alternative to the sprays you find in your local supermarkets!

Not all essential oils are safe for everyone; Who should beware of using Clove? Clove oil is a very strong oil and should always be used in a diluted form. If you are a person, like me, who has sensitive skin, you may want to avoid applying clove oil directly to your skin as it can irritate sensitive skin. However, you may still be able to use it in different ways, such an inhaling, to provide relief to certain repertory conditions. Additionally, it is not recommended that you ingest clove oil, in most cases (it is generally safe to use in the mouth as dental care). Instead stick to topical and aromatic methods.

What Can I Use Instead?
We recommend trying patchouli essential oil instead. If you have sensitive skin or are avoiding clove oil because you are pregnant or breastfeeding patchouli oil has some of the same uses such as treatment for athlete foot and it’s antiseptic properties, but it is a much more mild oil.
Check out our related articles:
Essential Oils to Avoid While Pregnant & Breastfeeding
How Substances Enter Your Body
How we Accumulate Toxins in our Bodies

Written by Nicolle Chase
SALVE and SalveNaturals.com © 2015 All Rights Reserved

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Anise Essential Oil

What are essential oils?
Essential oils are defined as a natural oil typically obtained by distillation and having the characteristic fragrance of the plant. Basically, it’s an oil that is derived from a plant, that still carries the essence of the plant with it, including the fragrance and it’s natural uses for a healthier body. Some essential oils can be used directly on the skin, while others cannot and certain essential oils should be avoided while pregnant. (See our previous blog post on essential oils to avoid while pregnant and breastfeeding.)

Anise Essential Oil Anise
Essential oil is made from the seeds of the Pimpinella anisum plant. For those of you who have already tried this essential oil, you may have noticed that its scent is similar to black licorice. While that may appeal to some of you, those of you who do not like the smell of anise essential oil by itself may find that mixing a few drops with a citrus, or vanilla scent will transform an ordinary scent into a lovely fragrance with subtle undertones. Anise has traditionally been used in everything from Egyptian bread to perfume used by fisherman to mask the human scent. Additionally, anise has been used by many cultures for it’s therapeutic and health properties.

Health Benefits of Anise Essential Oil
Anise essential oil has a number of therapeutic properties. This oil is antiseptic, which is useful for using on small cuts in order to provide a protective layer between the wound and the air. It is also antispasmodic; because it is a relaxant, it helps to relax spasms, it also works as a carminative (helping to relieve gas) by promoting the removal of excess gas. It also works remarkably well as an expectorant helping to loosen excess mucus and phlegm, providing relief from your cough. Anise essential oil is used by massage therapists to stimulate circulation; and used along with massage can help relieve some symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Other Benefits of Anise Essential Oil
Anise can be used as an insecticide as it is toxic to insects and even to some small animals (it is also been known to kill worms in the intestine).

Not all essential oils are safe for everyone. Who should beware of using Anise?
Small children and pets are at risk because this essential oil an be toxic to them, especially in large quantities. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding it is advised that you stay away from this essential oil. If you fit into one of these categories there are many safe essential oils that you can use instead.

What Can I Use Instead?
We recommend trying eucalyptus essential oil instead. it has many of the same characteristics but is safe to use for pregnant women in their 2nd and 3rd trimester.

We’re in the process of developing some safe products for baby care. Stay tuned!

Check out our related articles:
Essential Oils to Avoid While Pregnant & Breastfeeding
How Substances Enter Your Body
How we Accumulate Toxins in our Bodies

Written by Nicolle Chase
SALVE and SalveNaturals.com © 2015 All Rights Reserved

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Essential Oils to Avoid While Pregnant and Breastfeeding

Expectant and new moms are always careful to eat and do the right things to protect the health of their babies. We often take for granted that the many products we put on our body can affect the fetus and breast milk as well. This is because skin care product ingredients are absorbed instantly through our skin and directly into the blood stream impacting the health of both mommy and baby.

Even if you’re seeking an all natural skin care line while you are pregnant or breastfeeding (which is recommended), you should also know that certain essential oils should be avoided.

essential oilsWhat are Essential Oils?
Essential oils are a concentrated liquid that are derived from a plant by using the flowers, leaves and/or roots in a distillation process. The term “essential” signifies the aroma or “essence” of that plant. They are found in a variety of products more commonly including skin care, perfume, cleaning products, soaps, and food flavorings. Traditional and alternative medicine may incorporate essential oils into medical and healing applications, and have various regulations for use depending on the country. Generally speaking, essential oils can be infused in products, used directly on the skin, or used in a nebulizer to diffuse the essence into the air. Not all essential oils are created equal. This means, some oils shouldn’t be used directly on the skin, and some should only be used as aromatics.

Essential Oils to Avoid While Pregnant & Breast Feeding
While some would say approach with caution, we say, “Why take the risk?”

On a side note, it’s important to understand that the amount of time, concentration, method of absorption and other considerations need to be made. Check out our article on How Substances Enter Your Body  and How We Accumulate Toxins in our Bodies.

Below is a list of some ingredients that should be avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding (partial list). While pregnant and breastfeeding, always consult with your medical doctor before using these or any essential oils. Consult your physician before using any essential oil in a diffuser while pregnant.

  • Aloe (drinking juice): Do not use during pregnancy, lactation.
  • Anise (essential oil): Avoid internally and externally in pregnancy, breast-feeding.
  • Basil (essential oil): Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Bay (essential oil):  Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Bergamot (essential oil):  Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Cassia (essential oil): Should be avoided during pregnancy.
  • Cedarwood (essential oil):  Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Dandelion (root, tincture): Do not use during pregnancy or nursing.
  • Roman Chamomile (essential oil):  Avoid chamomile in the first trimester of pregnancy.
  • Cinnamon (essential oil):  Avoid during pregnancy, breast-feeding.
  • Clary Sage (essential oil):  Use with caution during pregnancy.  Only use after the first trimester.  Do not use when lactating.
  • Clove (essential oil):  Use with caution in pregnancy; externally, only after the first trimester.
  • Cypress (essential oil):  Avoid in pregnancy, breast-feeding.
  • Elemi (essential oil):  Avoid in pregnancy, with infants and young children.
  • Fennel (essential oil):  Avoid in pregnancy.
  • Garlic (essential oil):  Do not administer essential oil to babies. Best to avoid in pregnancy.
  • Geranium (essential oil):  Contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy.
  • Ginger (essential oil, teas):  Should not be used for morning sickness.
  • Jasmine (essential oil): Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Juniper (essential oil):  Contraindicated during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Lavender (essential oil):  Only after first trimester.
  • Lemongrass (essential oil): Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Marjoram (essential oil):  Has the potential to stimulate menstruation, do not use during pregnancy.
  • Nutmeg (powder):  Avoid in pregnancy.
  • Parsley (leaf): Avoid in excess during pregnancy and breast feeding.
  • Peppermint (essential oil):  Do not use during the first trimester of pregnancy or while breast-feeding.  Do not use with children younger than two years old.
  • Pine (essential oil): Contraindicated during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Red Clover (tincture): Avoid during pregnancy.
  • Rose (essential oil):  Contraindicated during the first trimester of pregnancy.
  • Rosemary (essential oil):  Contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy and should not be administered to babies or children younger than the age of four.
  • Sweet Basil (essential oil, leaf): Contraindicated for use while pregnant, breast-feeding, and with infants or toddlers. Do not use the essential oil during pregnancy or nursing.
  • Thyme (essential oil):  Contraindicated during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Yarrow (essential oil):  Contraindicated during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
  • Ylang Ylang (essential oil):  Avoid during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Using Naturally Unscented Skin Care
Naturally unscented skin care is quite easy to find. You can even make your own with some basic carrier oils such as grape seed, olive, sunflower and coconut oils. You can also use butters such as shea, jojoba, almond, macadamia, Brazil nut, and others.

Salvenaturals.com offers a natural and organic line of unscented body care products including scrubs, face care, and soap. You can always go online and search for additional unscented skin care manufacturers.

Written by: Dahlia Kelada

Source: http://traditionswellness.com/Herbs_and_Essential_Oils.html
Image: blahtherapy.com

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