Tag Archives: chemicals

What’s The Number At The Bottom of My Plastic Water Bottle?

Rumors have gone around that the number indicated on the bottom of your water bottle lets you know how many times you can reuse it. WRONG!!

The numbers actually indicate what plastic material the bottle is made of. Each number identifies the specific uses for any type of plastic-based product, from plastic wrap to yogurt containers.

Typically, only #1 and #2 with narrow necks can be placed in common plastic recycling bins. To recycle plastics with higher numbers, contact your local recycling facility. Find local recycling facilities for all types of materials. Numbers 1 and 2 plastics should only be used once – No refilling.

Plastic Recycling Symbols

HAVE YOU HEARD OF BPA?
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical found in many types of plastics.

According to the National Institute of Health: “BPA gets into our bodies when we eat or drink foods from containers made with BPA. Most plastic containers arena’t made with BPA, but it’s often found in a strong, see-through plastic called polycarbonate. (Polycarbonate containers with BPA usually have a #7 recycling symbol on the bottom, although not all plastics marked with drinking water from plastic bottle#7 contain BPA.) Scientists know that tiny amounts of BPA can leach out of these containers into foods and drinks.”

Some studies suggest that exposing the plastics to high temperatures can cause more BPA to seep into foods.

A recent study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that more than 90 percent of Americans age 6 and older have detectable levels of BPA in their urine.

A report from National Toxicology Program, released in September 2008, expressed “some concern” about BPA’s potential effects on infants, children and fetuses. Animal studies suggests that BPA exposure before adulthood can affect the brain, behavior and prostate gland.

PLASTIC & YOUR FOOD: Safety Tips

  • Avoid using plastic plastic food containerscontainers in the microwave. Chemicals are released from the plastic when heated and leech into the food. Don’t microwave food and drinks in plastic containers, unless they say “Microwave Safe.” Instead, use ceramic containers free of metallic paint.
  • Avoid using cling wrap in the microwave. Use waxed paper or a paper towel instead. If you must use plastic wrap, don’t let it touch your food.
  • Avoid plastic bottled water unless you’re traveling or live in an area of questionable water. Because bottled water is less regulated, it has less-certain purity and safety than tap water, and is much more expensive.
  • Reduce or eliminate the use of plastic bottles to avoid landfill waste and exposure to chemicals that leach from the plastic. There are biodegradable, bio-based plastic water bottles on the market.
  • Never put warm or hot liquids in a plastic bottle.
  • Bring your own bag to the grocery store. Avoid using plastic bags.
  • If you’re going to use plastic, use containers that do not contain BPA.

PLASTIC FACTS
Recycle: reprocessing of materials into new products
Reuse: the act of using something again
The bottling industry alone now uses up around 100 million barrels of oil a year to product their product packaging, and that doesn’t include the fuel used to transport them around the world.

BPA-FREE material
Only 1 percent of plastic bags produced globally each year are recycled. In a 2007 national survey, 72 percent of Americans did not know that plastic is an oil-based product. (Around 10 percent of U.S. oil consumption goes into making plastic.) Forty percent of people think that plastic biodegrades underground, in composts, landfills or out at sea. The truth is, it doesn’t biodegrade at all, at least not for up to a thousand years or more.

FACT: SALVE containers are BPA-free.

If we recycled every plastic bottle we used, we would keep two billion tons of plastic out of landfills. We use enough plastic wrap to wrap all of Texas every year.

Sources: Earth911.com; National Institute of Health, “Worried About Plastic Bottles;” Institute of Agriculture and Trade Policy; and CNN.com/Asia: Recycling Plastics

Written by Dahlia Kelada
SALVE and SalveNaturals.com © 2015 All Rights Reserved

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READ THE LABEL [CHAPTER 3] How do we accumulate toxins in our bodies?

Source: www.sheknows.co.uk
Source: www.sheknows.co.uk

While it may seem obvious, think of this as a refresher.

Food, especially genetically modified, processed or from poor quality sources are chemically laden to prevent spoilage on the store shelves. Plus it adds color and an irresistible taste that triggers your brain into wanting more. (There have been food industry studies on this topic of tricking consumers into an addiction, or “excitability” as the industry may term it.) These foods not only wreak havoc on the digestive system, but it accumulates as waste in the body and your organs don’t know what to do with it all. After years of drowning your body in these chemicals, as a result, your body will likely experience diseases such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, poor immunity and cognitive function. Healthy food, preferably organic, pesticide-free foods that are FRESH will not cause this reaction.

Medication, while they are created to relieve symptoms of disease and not the source of the disease (just my personal opinion), they too can accumulate in your body. Not all medicine is harmful, and many are removed from the body through urination and elimination. People with rheumatoid arthritis, for example, or other diseases where a cocktail list of prescription medications is recommended over a long period of time, even years, may impact the ability of the body to function normally. Remember, medicines are  chemicals, too. Really know what you’re putting into your body, and don’t be afraid to ask your doctors questions.

Exposure to the environment is often an uncontrolled exposure. As mentioned earlier, second hand smoke, stinky perfume, fertilizer in your neighborhood, pollution, etc. Not to mention chemicals used to clean your office building and bathrooms. BUT, there are environmental exposures you can control such as the cleaning chemicals used in your home, and the exposure to petroleum-based fragrances and air fresheners.

Stress, we’ve all heard it, causes problems in our bodies. There are two types of stress, eustress and distress. Eustress is good stress, like engagement, graduation, or even winning the lottery. Distress is bad stress that causes a cluster**** of disastrous effects in the body including adrenal fatigue, heart disease, depression, inability to concentrate, organ disruption, and immune system function. Sadly, these may often all at the same time. That’s why people recommend physical activity to decrease cortisol levels (which is the stress hormone) and even yoga. Emotional well being is just as important as physical well being; but you already knew that.

Products we use on our bodies are another method for toxins to get into our body. We talked a little bit about the structure of the skin in READ THE LABEL [PART 1]. So you’ll know that the epidermis (outer layer) provides a protective barrier. Unfortunately, many of the chemically-saturated products we expose ourselves to on a daily basis break the barrier of protection and can penetrate into our blood stream. Choose your products wisely and read the label!

Stay tuned for more excerpts from my presentation “READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural and Organic Skin Care.”

Written by Dahlia Kelada, from her presentation READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural & Organic Skin Care  © 2013 All Rights Reserved

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READ THE LABEL [CHAPTER 2] How Substances Enter Your Body

So the only way to get toxins in your body is if you present the opportunity for it to happen. Sometimes it’s controlled behavior, and others not.

There are four ways substances can enter your body:

1)   Ingestion, which basically means eating or putting something in your mouth. It doesn’t have to be swallowed for it to be considered ingested necessarily. The salivary glands produced in your mouth have enzymes that start to break down the food while it’s in your mouth. Meanwhile, signals get sent to your brain that food is coming, which tells your stomach to prepare. There are many blood vessels in the mouth, especially under the tongue that almost immediately start the absorption process, sending minerals and vitamins, and whatever else is in the food that can be easily absorbed, into the blood stream. That’s why you may have seen sublingual vitamin drops or tablets. “Sublingual” means “under the tongue.” Medicine often begins absorption before it’s even swallowed.

Source: www.howstuffworks.com
Source: www.howstuffworks.com

2)   Inhalation is another way substances enter the body. Not just through the nose, but also the mouth. The tiny hairs in our noses help filter debris and foreign microorganisms from entering our body. The mouth, on other the other hand, has no filter. Often times, we can control what we put in our mouths; but what we breathe through the mouth cannot always be controlled. For example, stinky cheap perfume from your office coworker. (If you follow my articles, you should know that perfume is made of 95% petrochemicals that is toxic to our bodies even if we breathe it.) You also can’t control the people smoking outside your office building, again toxins that enter the body.

3)   Injection is often overlooked as a method of getting toxins into the body. This isn’t only through needles from medicine or vitamin injections, but this is also from bites (animals, kids), cuts and scratches. For example, I love animals and often take Biscuit to the dog park. I know my dog is clean because I’m one of the good pet owners, but you don’t always know the other dogs at the park. One day I got bit by one beastly Kujo, and went and got a tetanus shot.  Why is the shot necessary? Well, one, any disease that dog may have that shot will help protect me from contracting anything, but also because there are hundreds of bacterial organisms in the mouths of animals (AND PEOPLE) that are on the very tip of teeth, and a bite injects that bacteria below the skin. Injection can also come from bites from nasty kids or from insects.

4)   Skin absorption is the more commonly recognized way of substances entering the body. While not all chemicals or ingredients get absorbed, many do and those that are not removed through normal digestion and elimination, can build up over time in the body causing toxic reactions to our immune, adrenal and reproductive systems.

Stay tuned for more excerpts from my presentation “READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural and Organic Skin Care.”

Written by Dahlia Kelada, from her presentation READ THE LABEL: Understanding Natural & Organic Skin Care  © 2013 All Rights Reserved

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